Bilawal Bhutto Zardari

Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, Profiles of Pakistan Leaders, PAKISTANI LEADERS ONLINE
Chairman
PPP
Bilawal Bhutto Zardari


Charisma is something Bilawal has probably inherited. This young lad has this power, so had his mother and so had his very dynamic grand father.

“I am missing my mama. Yes, I am”, Bilawal may not utter these words quite very often but the lad, who lost his mother probably at a young age, has the words ‘Miss You’ written all over his face. He looked so forlorn and lost at her mother’s death, that it gave an impression of a magnanimous tragedy – which it was, for sure.

“My mother used to say: Democracy is the best revenge”, Bilawal said this in a firm tone when he was made the Chairperson of “Pakistan Peoples’ Party”, after her mother Ms. Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in Rawalpindi on 27th December, 2007.

‘Bilawal Zardari’ now ‘Bilawal Bhutto Zardari’ is the eldest of the three children of former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto and Pakistani political figure Asif Ali Zardari. Bilawal was born on 21st September 1988. His birth was celebrated throughout the country especially in high cadres of PPP, and he was fondly referred to as 'the baby who fooled the President', as the dictator at the time had planned to hold the election on the day he was expected to be born, however, he was born early. Bilawal was till recently was living in with his mother in Dubai, United Arab Emirates before her assassination in Liaqat Bagh, Rawalpindi. He graduated from Rashid School for Boys, a school owned by the ruling family of Dubai, providing the highest standards of education to the elite in the country. He is currently studying at Oxford University, U.K.

A famous political family, a large bank account, studentship at the Oxford University, future as the leader of one of Pakistan’s largest political party and a tragedy foisted onto his young shoulders – all these factors have combined to propel Bilawal Bhutto to shine out as a confident and favorite young boy.

Youngsters, especially girls, have a soft corner for Bilawal. He is young and handsome which makes him the apple of everyone’s eye. Moreover, the fact that he is studying at Oxford is a positive and healthy sign; for Pakistan will have a well-groomed and educated leader once he completes his degree at Oxford. Sticking to his education in the face of such distressing circumstances and trying times has made him all the more favorite.

Girls of all ages, it seems, have decided that Bilawal is as worthy of fan-worship as any pop-star or actor. The internet, especially, is clustered with enamored Bilawal Bhutto fans, declaring him to be ‘100% cute’, ‘charming’, ‘wise’ and ‘adorable’.

Bilawal has shown a politically mature mind in the few interviews he has given. He expressed his desire for the country to become democratic as 'the founding father intended it to be' and championed his parents' struggle. He avoids questions concerning his political future by saying 'he is too young to decide... but wants to serve the people of Pakistan and there is more than one way to do so'.

His parents had kept him out of the limelight, so that he could concentrate on his academia. However, the death of his mother has changed the overall landscape, altogether. It is a paradigm shift for Bilawal, indeed. He is quite very sensible and has accepted the responsibility that has come his way. Bilawal and his siblings have decided to make BHUTTO a part of their ProfileNames – a welcoming gesture, indeed; and that too out of sheer love for their mother who gave her life for democracy.

Bilawal’s mother and his maternal grand father – Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, fought for democracy and now Bilawal has to carry the torch forward. He has to lead from the front, in order to make Pakistan a vibrant Islamic State. Bilawal probably has what it takes to be a leader. He is willing to embark on a voyage, which though is fraught with unmapped challenges, but still he has the determination and courage and he believes that democracy is definitely the “Best Revenge”.



(Profile by: Talha Abbasi)